Everything You Need To Know About Migrating Workloads

workload migration

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Migrating workloads, moving data, assets, software, etc. from one location to another, can get complex quickly. A new white paper from Digital Realty walks readers through what makes a workload a good candidate for migration, and highlights four major issues that organizations should be sure to steer clear of during a migration. Download the new report today, designed to help you with best practices for workload migration to keep your enterprise moving.

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 Migrating workloads can get complex quickly. So what does workload migration actually mean? 

Migrating a workload simply means that you’re moving data, assets, software, etc., from one location to another. For example, a previously on-premise workload can be moved into a cloud environment or migrated between physical locations. 

Cloud migrations in particular are proving to be enormously popular. The cloud migration service market grew almost 32 percent in 2018, reaching a valuation of $72.4 billion in the year, according to a Gartner study. And a Forrester analyst has also found that 69 percent of companies in Europe and North America are migrating workloads to cloud environments.

Just about any workload can be migrated, so long as its assets and components are currently in definable locations. That said, the new paper walks readers through what makes a workload a good candidate for migration, and highlights four major issues that organizations should be sure to steer clear of during a migration.

Download Digital Realty’s new white paper today, designed to help you with best practices for workload migration to keep your enterprise moving.